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Bring Back Bison

Let's bring bison back to our Zoo!

Latest News

Smithsonian Conservation Biology Institute and National Zoo Launches Endangered Song Project

April 22, 2014

The Smithsonian Conservation Biology Institute and National Zoo announced today, Earth Day, the launch of the Endangered Song Project, an analog-meets-digital awareness campaign that calls upon 400 participants to use their social media strength to spread the message that there are only 400 Sumatran tigers left in the wild.

Recent News

National Zoo’s Bear Cub and Seal Pup Are Named

April 17, 2014

The sloth bear cub born at the Smithsonian’s National Zoo Dec. 29 has been named Remi by the people who know her best—her keepers. They have been hand-rearing the cub 24 hours a day since a week after she was born, becoming her surrogate parents.

Elderly Mangabey Euthanized at the National Zoo

April 15, 2014

The Smithsonian’s National Zoo is sad to report that Maude, a geriatric grey-cheeked mangabey, was humanely euthanized April 14. Maude well surpassed the typical lifespan (early 30s) of her species. She was 41 years old.

Giant Panda Bao Bao May Start Venturing Outside This Week

March 31, 2014

Seven-month-old Bao Bao will have access to her mother Mei Xiang’s (may-SHONG) larger yard this week beginning each day around 8 a.m., weather depending. Bao Bao will be given the option to explore outside with her mother if the temperature is at least 35 degrees Fahrenheit with no precipitation. Although Bao Bao will have the option to go outside, she may decide to stay inside the panda house. It may take several weeks before Bao Bao is venturing outside with Mei Xiang regularly.

Keepers Hand-Rearing Sloth Bear Cub at the National Zoo

March 20, 2014

The decision for keepers at the Smithsonian’s National Zoo to hand-raise a female sloth bear cub instead of leaving her with her mother Khali likely saved her life. She is now very active and growing as the result of the round-the-clock care she has received for the past two-and-a-half months.

Photo Release: Smithsonian Conservation Biology Institute Mourns Loss of Elderly Przewalski’s Horse

March 18, 2014

The Smithsonian Conservation Biology Institute’s 32-year-old female Przewalski’s (Shah-VAL-skee) horse, Misha, was humanely euthanized March 12. Misha was one of three horses to arrive at SCBI in Front Royal, Va. in 1984 and the oldest Przewalski’s horse in the Association of Zoos and Aquariums Species Survival Program. As the most dominant mare in her herd group, she was pivotal in establishing the SCBI research program.

Dama Gazelles Born at Smithsonian Conservation Biology Institute

March 11, 2014

Animal care staff at the Smithsonian Conservation Biology Institute in Front Royal, Va. are celebrating the birth of three male Dama gazelles. The calves were born Feb. 18, Feb. 20 and Feb. 25. At their 24-hour neonatal exam, the first calf weighed 11 pounds and the second and third calves weighed 12 pounds each.

National Zoo’s African Lion Gives Birth to Four Cubs

March 4, 2014

March came in like a lion—four lions, to be exact— 9-year-old African lion Shera gave birth to a litter at the Great Cats exhibit at the Smithsonian’s National Zoo. Their delivery March 2 spanned a seven-hour period, from 8:27 a.m. to 3:17 p.m. These cubs are the second litter for Shera and the fifth for 8-year-old father, Luke. Recently, Luke also sired 10-year-old Nababiep’s two female cubs born Jan. 24.

Celebrate American Bison and the Smithsonian’s National Zoo at 125 Years: Summer 2014

February 28, 2014

On March 2, 1889, President Grover Cleveland signed a bill passed by both Houses that officially established the National Zoo and allocated funds for the purchase of land. To celebrate its 125th Anniversary, the Smithsonian’s National Zoo is proud to bring back the animal that sparked the conservation movement and the founding of the Zoo—the great American bison. The bison exhibit is set to open in July/August of 2014.

National Zoo’s Elderly Giant Pacific Octopus Dies

February 12, 2014

Pandora, the female giant Pacific octopus at the Smithsonian’s National Zoo, died yesterday. Animal care staff estimate that Pandora was about 5 years old. The median lifespan for giant Pacific octopuses is about 3 to 5 years. Pandora came to the Zoo in November 2011 when she was about 1.5 years old. She lived at the Zoo’s Invertebrate Exhibit for 27 months—longer than any of her predecessors.

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