Me and the Bee Playground sponsored by Land O' Lakes, inc. now open!
Share this page:

Small Mammal House News Archive

May. 18, 2018
The Smithsonian’s National Zoo and Conservation Biology Institute is dedicated to saving species. Every day, its scientists and partners undertake important conservation efforts to protect species... read more
Meet a Mammal
May. 11, 2018
Members can get up close and personal with animals from 8 to 9 a.m. on May 12.
Animal keeper Kara Ingraham with a white-nosed coati at the Small Mammal House.
May. 04, 2018
Two-year-old coati sisters Quinn and Ivy are always on the move. Find out how their keeper trained them to sit still and voluntarily participate in their own care.
fennec foxes
Apr. 12, 2018
Get the answers to some of the most-searched questions about the desert dwelling, big-eared fennec fox!
Mar. 14, 2018
Senior Scientist and Head of the Center for Species Survival at the Smithsonian Conservation Biology Institute David Wildt has been chosen to receive the 2017 Smithsonian Distinguished Scholar Award... read more
Prehensile-tailed porcupine
Mar. 08, 2018
A well-known prehensile-tailed porcupine named Clark died March 7 at the Smithsonian’s National Zoo. Clark had developed intermittent wheezing and a suspected upper-respiratory tract infection... read more
Two-toed sloth Ms Chips
Jan. 05, 2018
Ms. Chips, a two-toed sloth and longtime resident of the Smithsonian’s National Zoo, died overnight Jan. 2. She was 46 years old. The median life expectancy for female two-toed sloths in human care... read more
Przewalski's horse colt
Nov. 22, 2017
The Smithsonian Conservation Biology Institute's Przewalksi's horse colt Zygmund (or “Ziggy” as keepers affectionately refer to him) is growing into a powerful stallion. 
Nov. 03, 2017
Some of the Zoo’s most marvelous mammals are also the smallest—from alluring armadillos to endearing naked mole-rats. More than 35 species are on the move at the Small Mammal House, and it takes a... read more
Nov. 01, 2017
In September 2017, Conservation Ecology Center researcher John McEvoy traveled to Mongolia to study the movement behavior of reintroduced Przewalski’s horses.