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VISITORS: Despite the government shutdown, the Zoo remains OPEN Monday, Jan. 22 and Tuesday, Jan. 23.
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Asia Trail News Archive

Aug. 29, 2015
Mei Xiang and her cub did well overnight! The cub is nursing, and Mei is taking excellent care of him. She did not leave the den last night, but keepers are offering her water and juice to keep her... read more
Aug. 28, 2015
Scientists at the Smithsonian Conservation Biology Institute's Center for Conservation and Evolutionary Genetics confirmed that the giant panda cub born Aug. 22 at the National Zoo is male. A... read more
Aug. 27, 2015
Overnight it was evident to panda keepers and veterinarians that our healthy panda cub was active and nursing appropriately throughout the night. Mei is showing proper maternal care which includes... read more
Aug. 26, 2015
The smaller of the two giant panda cubs born at the Smithsonian's National Zoo Aug. 22, died shortly after 2 p.m. today, Aug. 26. The panda team rotated both cubs in the past 24 hours allowing each... read more
Aug. 24, 2015
Our panda cubs are doing well but the panda team had a challenging night. When they tried to swap the cubs at 11p.m., Mei Xiang would not set down the cub she had in her possession. Consequently, the... read more
Giant panda cub in the hands of a veterinarian
Aug. 23, 2015
The Smithsonian's National Zoo and Conservation Biology Institute confirms one giant panda cub born at 5:35 p.m. and a second giant panda cub was born at 10:07 p.m., Aug, 22.
Still from Pandacam of Mei Xiang giving birth
Aug. 22, 2015
Giant panda Mei Xiang gave birth to a cub at 5:35 pm! Mei Xiang reacted to the cub by picking it up. The panda team began preparing for a birth when they saw Mei Xiang's water break at 4:32 pm and... read more
Aug. 19, 2015
For the first time at the National Zoo, veterinarians detected something new during an ultrasound procedure this morning on giant panda Mei Xiang. They believe it is a developing giant panda fetus.
Aug. 10, 2015
Smithsonian Conservation Biology Institute (SCBI) scientists have confirmed a secondary rise in giant panda Mei Xiang's (may-SHONG) urinary progesterone levels.