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Vote to Name Our Little P-horses!

Note: Voting is now closed. Check back soon for the results!

The Smithsonian Conservation Biology Institute welcomed four endangered Przewalski’s (cha-VAL-ski) horse foals (affectionately referred to as P-horses) in spring. We need your help naming three colts!

The foals live in a herd with their mothers and are quickly growing into mature horses. They are very relaxed, but will quickly vocalize if they are not in visual contact of the herd. Despite being close in age and living together, the foals are developing distinct personalities.

About the Names:

  • Takhi Twist | Takhi is the Mongolian word for P-horse.
  • Ulaanbaatar Hero | Ulaanbaatar is the capital of Mongolia.
  • Steppenhoof | Przewalski's horses are native to the steppes of the Gobi Desert in Mongolia.
  • Gobi Wan Kenobi | P-horses live in the Gobi Desert in Mongolia.
  • Citizen Mane | Przewalski's horses have dark, spiky manes and no forelock.

Learn more about each colt below, and cast a vote for your three favorite names! The winning names will be announced on Monday, Aug. 13.

Colt #1

Date of birth: March 23

Mom: Anne

Personality: Outgoing, confident and eager to investigate new things. The only foal that is more outgoing with a keen sense of curiosity is our filly!

Identifying characteristics: A classic, mocha-colored coat that fades to a very light beige on his legs and belly

Colt #2

Date of birth: April 30

Mom: Winnie

Personality: Very herd-motivated. He sticks close to the other foals and the herd, and pretty much does whatever they are doing.

Identifying characteristics: Mocha-colored with darker patches around his mouth and eyes

Colt #3

Date of birth: May 29

Mom: Emma

Personality: Indecisive and a tiny bit clumsy but tags along with the older foals

Identifying characteristics: Very pale brown with a slightly fuzzy coat that will grow out as he gets older

Przewalski's horse

Przewalski's horses, critically endangered horses found in Mongolia, are the last truly wild horse. Once thought to be the ancestor to the domestic horse, they are actually distant cousins. Mitochondrial DNA suggests that they diverged from a common ancestor 500,000 years ago.

Tracking Takhi on the Steppe

A Przewalski's horse running through the grass with large boulders in the background
In September 2017, Conservation Ecology Center researcher John McEvoy traveled to Mongolia to study the movement behavior of reintroduced Przewalski’s horses.