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Conservation News

A small bird with black, white and gray feathers, called a Carolina chickadee, holds a green caterpillar in its beak
Oct. 22, 2018
Insect-eating birds that depend on high-calorie, high-protein cuisine (namely caterpillars and spiders) to feed their young are finding the menu severely lacking in backyards landscaped with even a...
Baboons in Ethiopia
Oct. 18, 2018
For the past two years, Global Health Program veterinarian Dawn Zimmerman traveled to Awash National Park in Ethiopia to collar hamadryas baboons, helping researchers track the primates and study...
Foxcroft School Pangolin Scales
Oct. 05, 2018
As part of the Explorations in Engineering program at Foxcroft School in Middleburg, Virginia, students had a rare opportunity to help Smithsonian scientists save two critically endangered species:...
A group of George Mason University students pose in front of a Mount Kenya National Park World Heritage Area building
Oct. 05, 2018
George Mason University students recently traveled to the Mpala Research Centre in Kenya to work with Smithsonian scientists as part of a course on emerging infectious disease.
A wolf fish with its mouth open displaying sharp teeth
Sep. 05, 2018
Smithsonian researchers are busy in the Peruvian Amazon monitoring wildlife around areas where pipelines, roads and other infrastructure may be built.
Marc Valitutto tests a pangolin for diseases at the Saving Vietnam's Wildlife center.
Aug. 30, 2018
Global Health Program veterinarian Dr. Marc Valitutto traveled to the Save Vietnam’s Wildlife center in Cuc Phuong National Park, where hundreds of confiscated pangolins are received each year for...
Virginia Working Landscapes at the Smithsonian Conservation Biology Institute's Racetrack Hill.
Aug. 30, 2018
Follow a day in the life of Virginia Working Landscapes scientists. 
A group of George Mason University undergrad students pose for a photo in the field in Kenya
Aug. 20, 2018
Twenty undergraduate students from George Mason University joined the Smithsonian Conservation Biology Institute's Global Health Program in the field from July 31 to Aug. 13, 2018.
Four Przewalski's horse foals at the Smithsonian Conservation Biology Institute.
Aug. 06, 2018
Four endangered Przewalski’s (sha-VAL-ski) horse foals were born at the Smithsonian Conservation Biology Institute between March and June. SCBI is asking the public to help name the three colts.
Cheetah cubs in their yard at the Smithsonian Conservation Biology Institute.
Jul. 20, 2018
The Smithsonian Conservation Biology Institute welcomed a litter of seven chirping cheetah cubs July 9. The cubs appear to be healthy and doing well.
Course participants doing an exercise.
Jul. 20, 2018
Smithsonian Conservation Biology Institute scientists work in more than 25 countries around the world. They recently took their expertise to the Amazon in Peru, where they hosted a course to help...
Students flying drones
Jul. 20, 2018
Grassland birds incubate their nests at around 86 degrees Fahrenheit — hot enough for a drone outfitted with a thermal camera to detect. Virginia Working Landscapes and students at James Madison...
Flying Fox
Jul. 06, 2018
SCBI scientists are using innovative GPS tracking collars to better understand the flight patterns of Myanmar's flying foxes.
Guam kingfisher chick
Jul. 06, 2018
A female Guam kingfisher, a brightly colored bird and one of the most endangered bird species on the planet, hatched at the Smithsonian Conservation Biology Institute (SCBI) in Front Royal, Virginia...
Jun. 21, 2018
Smithsonian Bird Friendly® coffee was the big winner at a recent online charity auction.
Jun. 01, 2018
Maned wolves in the North American population have their own matchmaker. Nucharin Songsasen is a biologist at SCBI and Species Survival Plan coordinator. It's her job to decide which animals to breed...
Male Asian elephant in Myanmar.
Jun. 01, 2018
Learn all about studying elephant personalities in this Q&A with Shifra Goldenberg, a research associate with the Smithsonian Conservation Biology Institute’s Conservation Ecology Center.
A close-up photo of a wood turtle's face. The turtle has yellow eyes and black and yellow-orange mottled skin
May. 23, 2018
The hare may be quicker than the turtle, but does it actually move more? Smithsonian researchers are tracking wood turtles to better understand how they navigate their environment.
A blue and white bird, called a cerulean warbler, being held in a researcher's hand
May. 10, 2018
In Texas, a team of Smithsonian Migratory Bird Center scientists is studying birds that travel through the Gulf of Mexico.
The head and neck of a giraffe wearing a GPS tracker
May. 04, 2018
What is causing the disappearance of reticulated giraffes across the plains where they were once plentiful? Smithsonian Conservation Biology Institute scientists and partners are on the case.
A small, gray-brown and white bird, called a Louisiana waterthrush, being held in a researcher's hand
Apr. 27, 2018
In March, a team of Smithsonian Migratory Bird Center scientists traveled to Texas to begin their annual study of birds that travel through the Gulf of Mexico.
Lady Elliot Reef
Apr. 24, 2018
Smithsonian scientists are part of an expanding global effort set to tackle what could be the most ambitious project in the history of biology—sequencing the DNA of all eukaryotic species on Earth,...
Brown pelican sitting on nest in the Chesapeake Bay.
Apr. 20, 2018
Brown pelicans are a favorite of visitors to the Smithsonian’s National Zoo’s American Trail exhibit. Yet, many zoogoers may not realize that these marine birds call the Chesapeake Bay home. Last...
Takin at the Motithang Takin Preserve in Thimpu, Bhutan.
Apr. 20, 2018
As a wildlife veterinarian for the SCBI’s Global Health Program, Dr. Marc Valitutto was asked to visit and evaluate the Royal Takin Preserve in Thimpu, Bhutan, to help build their veterinary capacity...
Cheetah cub Nandi.
Apr. 20, 2018
Over the last year, a record 91 cheetah cubs have been born at institutions affiliated with the Association of Zoos and Aquariums’ Cheetah Species Survival Plan (SSP). In this Q&A, Smithsonian...