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Coral Reproduction and Cryopreservation News

An aerial shot of a curving shoreline in Curacao with clear blue water and a grassy and sandy landscape
Jun. 07, 2021
From the deepest trenches to the shallowest shores and across five basins, water circulates in one interconnected system: the world ocean. This World Ocean Day, discover how seemingly different...
Two bison -- large mammals with thick fur coats, rounded sharp horns, big heads and large shoulder humps -- walk through tall grass at sunset
Dec. 27, 2018
The Smithsonian’s National Zoo and Conservation Biology Institute is dedicated to saving species. Every year, its team of conservationists here and around the globe works hard to make that mission a...
A large elkhorn coral underwater on a sunny day in Curacao
Dec. 12, 2018
Smithsonian scientists and partners in Florida and Curaçao have become the first to use cryopreserved (frozen) coral sperm to support gene migration of coral populations that would otherwise remain...
Black-and-white image of a zebrafish embryo under a microscope
Jul. 13, 2017
A new cryopreservation study has sweeping implications for wildlife conservation and human health. In a paper published July 13 in ACS Nano, the Smithsonian Conservation Biology Institute and...
A tenuis spawning
Jun. 30, 2016
Smithsonian Conservation Biology Institute (SCBI) scientists are working furiously to beat the bleaching clock and cryopreserve coral. But, they’ve run into a wall: bleaching is causing coral to...
Dec. 01, 2014
This update was written by Virginia Carter, a Smithsonian coral biologist with the Hawaii Institute of Marine Biology
coral
Nov. 01, 2012
Coral reefs around the world are being impacted at an alarming rate. Globally, reefs face rising ocean temperatures and resulting ocean acidification.
Mar. 01, 2010
By Mike Henley, Invertebrate Exhibit Keeper at the National Zoo