X
× As a public health precaution due to COVID-19, all Smithsonian museums are temporarily closed. We are not announcing a reopening date at this time and will provide updates on our website and social media.
Share this page:

A Brief History of Giant Pandas at the Zoo

At dinner in Beijing in Feb. 1972, First Lady Patricia Nixon mentioned her fondness for giant pandas to Chinese Premier Zhou Enlai. Eager for better relations with the U.S., Zhou knew just what to say: "I'll give you some." On April 16, 1972, President and Mrs. Nixon formally welcomed giant pandas Ling-Ling (a female) and Hsing-Hsing (a male) to the Smithsonian's National Zoo. Over the next 20 years, Ling-Ling and Hsing-Hsing produced five cubs. Sadly, none of the offspring survived for more than a few days. But ever since their arrival, the pandas have symbolized cross-cultural collaboration between the United States and China.

The arrival of giant pandas drew millions of fans from around the world to the Zoo. More importantly, it gave the Zoo an unparalleled opportunity to study giant panda behavior, health and reproduction. Specifically, it allowed scientists at the Smithsonian Conservation Biology Institute to learn about panda estrus, breeding, pregnancy, pseudopregnancy and cub development. Armed with this knowledge, the Zoo became a leader in giant panda conservation and shared the information learned with other institutions that wanted to care for and breed this endangered species.

On Dec. 6, 2000, giant pandas Mei Xiang and Tian Tian arrived at the Zoo. Unlike Ling-Ling and Hsing-Hsing, however, the Zoo's second pair of pandas are on loan. In exchange, the Zoo contributes funds and expertise toward conservation efforts in China. The Zoo has renewed its Giant Panda Cooperative Research and Breeding Agreement with the CWCA twice since 2000. The current research agreement extension was signed Dec. 7, 2020 and stipulates giant pandas will continue to live at the Zoo through 2023.

David M. Rubenstein has provided multiple gifts to support the giant panda program dating back to 2011, with his most recent gift in December 2020 providing funding for the program through 2023. Mr. Rubenstein has donated a total of $12 million in support of the Zoo's giant panda conservation program. In appreciation, the giant panda complex — home to giant pandas Tian Tian (male), Mei Xiang (female) and Xiao Qi Ji (male) — was named the David M. Rubenstein Family Giant Panda Habitat. The gifts support conservation efforts in China, including research on restoring giant panda habitat, monitoring wildlife diseases, assessing impacts of climate change, and supporting more conservation capacity-building programs; upgrades to the giant panda habitat and exhibit at the Zoo; care for the pandas living at the Zoo; and public education about the species and its conservation.

Giant Panda at the Smithsonian's National Zoo Timeline

1972: Ling-Ling and Hsing-Hsing (shing-shing), the Smithsonian's National Zoo's first pair of giant pandas, arrived from China in April as a gift to the American people to commemorate President Nixon's historic visit to China.

During their 20 years together at the National Zoo, this panda pair produced five cubs; none of the cubs survived.

1983: After a decade of trial and error, Ling-Ling and Hsing-Hsing mated for the first time. Ling-Ling was also artificially inseminated with semen from Chia-Chia (cha cha), a giant panda in London. On July 21, Ling-Ling gave birth to a male cub that died three hours later of pneumonia. Using DNA analysis, Smithsonian Conservation Biology Institute scientists determined the cub was Hsing-Hsing's.

1984 – 1989: The pair went on to produce four more cubs during this time. One cub was stillborn in 1984. Twins were born in 1987 — one died quickly from a lack of oxygen and the other succumbed to an infection four days later. The last cub, born in 1989, died of pneumonia 23 hours after birth.

1983 – 1991: In addition to the five pregnancies, Ling-Ling also experienced many pseudopregnancies.

1992: Ling-Ling died Dec. 30, of heart failure; she was 23.

1999: Hsing-Hsing, suffering from several debilitating, age-related diseases, including terminal kidney disease, was euthanized Nov. 28, 1999; he was 28.

2000: The National Zoo's second pair of giant pandas, Mei Xiang (may-SHONG) and Tian Tian (tee-YEN tee-YEN), arrived in Washington, D.C., on Dec. 6. An agreement reached with the Chinese government stipulated that the pair would live at the Smithsonian's National Zoo for 10 years in exchange for $10 million. Funds were raised from private donors, including lead corporate sponsor Fujifilm and exclusive media partner Animal Planet.

2003: Mei Xiang and Tian Tian attempted to mate but were unsuccessful.

2004: SCBI scientists vaginally inseminated Mei Xiang with Tian Tian's sperm during a non-anesthesia procedure after attempts at natural breeding were unsuccessful. Mei Xiang had a pseudopregnancy.

2005: SCBI scientists and National Zoo veterinarians artificially inseminated Mei Xiang March 11, after it was determined that no successful natural breeding occurred between the pandas during the previous 24 hours. Mei Xiang gave birth to the Zoo's first surviving giant panda cub, Tai Shan, July 9, at 3:41 a.m.

2007: SCBI scientists and National Zoo veterinarians performed two artificial inseminations on Mei Xiang April 4 and 5. The procedures used semen collected from Gao Gao, the adult male at the San Diego Zoo. The procedures were unsuccessful and Mei Xiang had a pseudopregnancy.

2008: National Zoo scientists and veterinarians performed an artificial insemination on Mei Xiang March 19, using fresh semen from Tian Tian. The procedures were unsuccessful and it is believed that Mei Xiang experienced either a pseudopregnancy or the loss of a developing fetus.

2009: SCBI scientists artificially inseminated Mei Xiang Jan. 17, using a very good quality semen sample from Tian Tian. The procedures were unsuccessful and Mei Xiang had a pseudopregnancy.

2010: SCBI scientists artificially inseminated Mei Xiang Jan. 9 and 10, using semen from Tian Tian. Mei Xiang had a pseudopregnancy.

Tai Shan, the only surviving giant panda cub born at the National Zoo, left for Wolong Nature Reserve, China, Feb. 4, to participate in breeding research.

2011: Dennis Kelly, director of the Smithsonian's National Zoo, and Zang Chunlin, secretary general of the China Wildlife Conservation Association, signed a new Giant Panda Cooperative Research and Breeding Agreement Jan. 20. The agreement stipulated that giant pandas Mei Xiang and Tian Tian would remain at the Zoo until Dec.15, 2015.

Mei Xiang and Tian Tian's attempts at natural breeding Jan. 29 were unsuccessful. Reproductive experts from China and experts from SCBI performed an artificial insemination with frozen semen collected from Tian Tian in 2005. A second artificial insemination was performed Jan. 30. SCBI scientists confirmed that Mei Xiang had a pseudopregnancy July 21.

The Zoo announced that David M. Rubenstein donated $4.5 million Dec. 19, to fund its giant panda program through the end of 2015. It also announced that if Mei Xiang and Tian Tian failed to produce a cub in the 2012 breeding season, it was possible that both or one of the bears would return to China.

2012: A team of SCBI scientists and Chinese scientists artificially inseminated Mei Xiang April 29 and 30, using semen from Tian Tian collected and frozen in 2005, after attempts at natural breeding were unsuccessful. Mei Xiang gave birth to a cub Sept. 16, at 10:46 p.m. The cub died Sept. 23. Necropsy results revealed that the cub was a female and she had under-developed lungs, which resulted in liver damage.

2013: Mei Xiang and Tian Tian attempted to mate March 29, but were unsuccessful. A team of SCBI scientists and veterinarians, and Chinese scientists performed two artificial inseminations on Mei Xiang March 30. The artificial inseminations used fresh semen and frozen semen from Tian Tian collected in 2003, and frozen semen collected in 2003 from the San Diego Zoo's panda Gao Gao. Mei Xiang gave birth to Bao Bao Aug. 23 at 5:32 p.m. Mei Xiang gave birth to a second stillborn cub 26 hours later, but the cub was never viable. DNA analysis confirmed that Bao Bao was sired by Tian Tian.

2015: Mei Xiang was artificially inseminated April 26 and 27. Both procedures used frozen semen from Hui Hui (hWEI-hWEI), a 10 year-old panda living in China, and fresh semen collected from Tian Tian. Veterinarians saw a fetus on an ultrasound Aug. 19. Mei Xiang gave birth to two male cubs Aug. 22, at 5:35 p.m. and 10:07 p.m. The smaller of the two cubs died Aug. 26. Zoo pathologists and veterinarians determined that complications associated with aspiration of food material into the cub's respiratory system resulted in the development of pneumonia.

On Sept. 25, 2015, the First Lady of the United States and the First Lady of the People's Republic of China named the cub Bei Bei.

Dennis Kelly, director of the Smithsonian's National Zoo, and Li Qingwen, deputy secretary general of the China Wildlife and Conservation Association (CWCA), signed a new Giant Panda Cooperative Research and Breeding Agreement effective through Dec. 7, 2020. The agreement was announced Nov. 19, 2015. The terms of the agreement were exactly the same as the previous one, stipulating that the Smithsonian's National Zoo and CWCA would conduct cooperative research projects, the Zoo would pay $500,000 per year to support conservation efforts in China, and any cubs born at the Zoo may stay until the age of 4. Both parents and any offspring remained under the ownership of China.

2017:Mei Xiang's second surviving cub, Bao Bao, departed for China on Feb. 21, 2017.

2019: On Feb. 23, 2019, the Zoo and the Embassy of the People’s Republic of China hosted a housewarming to celebrate the new exhibit for visitors inside the panda house. The interactive exhibit highlights the ecology, history, reproduction, conservation and care of giant pandas through a series of games and activities

2019: Mei Xiang's third surviving cub, Bei Bei, departed for China on Nov. 19, 2019.

2020: Mei Xiang was artificially inseminated on March 22 using frozen semen from Tian Tian. Veterinarians saw fetal tissue on an ultrasound on Aug. 14 and Mei Xiang gave birth to a fourth surviving cub on Aug. 21, at 6:35 p.m. The cub is male. On Nov. 23, following a public vote, the cub was named Xiao Qi Ji (SHIAU-chi-ji).

On Dec. 7, 2020, the Smithsonian's National Zoo and Conservation Biology Institute announced that giant pandas will continue to live at the Zoo through the end of 2023. The three-year agreement extension signed by Smithsonian’s National Zoo and Conservation Biology Institute and China Wildlife and Conservation Association (CWCA) is effective through Dec. 7, 2023. The terms of the agreement extension are similar to previous agreements. Cub Xiao Qi Ji (SHIAU-chi-ji), born at the Zoo Aug. 21, female giant panda Mei Xiang (may-SHONG), age 22, and male giant panda Tian Tian (tee-YEN tee-YEN), age 23, will go to China at the end of the three-year agreement extension.