Conservation

Learn how scientists around the world are saving species
  • Aerial view of SCBI buildings in Front Royal, Virginia
Share this page:

Smithsonian Conservation Biology Institute

Smithsonian Conservation Biology Institute

The Smithsonian Conservation Biology Institute (SCBI) plays a leading role in the Smithsonian’s global efforts to save wildlife species from extinction and train future generations of conservationists. SCBI spearheads research programs at its headquarters in Front Royal, Virginia, the Smithsonian’s National Zoo in Washington, D.C., and at field research stations and training sites worldwide. SCBI scientists tackle some of today’s most complex conservation challenges by applying and sharing what they learn about animal behavior and reproduction, ecology, genetics, migration and conservation sustainability.

Please Note: The SCBI facility in Front Royal, Virginia, is closed to the public, with the exception of the annual Autumn Conservation Festival.

SCBI Animals

coalition of five cheetahs sitting on a rock in the grass The SCBI Department of Animal Programs team currently manages 12 mammal and nine bird species in 24 specialized barns and building complexes spread over more than 1,000 acres at the Smithsonian... read more

Support SCBI

clouded leopard cubs

The Smithsonian Conservation Biology Institute, a breeding, research and training facility with outposts around the globe, saves species using science.

Virginia Working Landscapes

rusty patch bumblebee

Virginia Working Landscapes is a network of conservation organizations and local landowners led and overseen by SCBI and partners. Together, they work to protect Virginia’s natural biodiversity and promote sustainable land-use practices.

Lectures

Scientists traveling on an elephant conducting GPS work in Myanmar

Journey with Smithsonian scientists and other conservation professionals as they travel the globe to study and protect species and ecosystems. Share in their adventures during these free science lecture series. The series is free and open to the public.