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Elephant Cam

Now in high-definition, these cameras are operated by Friends of the National Zoo volunteers to ensure web visitors have the chance to see the Smithsonian's National Zoo's six Asian elephants—Ambika, Shanthi, Bozie, Kamala, Swarna, and Maharani—both inside the Elephant Community Center and outside in their yards.

Please note: While the cameras will be streaming live 24-hours a day, volunteer operators will only be following the elephants during regular business hours.

Asian elephant

An elepthant curls its trunk and lifts its foot

The largest living land mammals, elephants are intelligent, social and vital to their ecosystems. Slightly smaller than their African cousins, Asian elephants are native to India and Southeast... read more

Adopt an Asian Elephant

asian elephant

Asian elephants are classified as endangered on the IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. Perhaps only 30,000 still live in forests of south and southeast Asia. For nearly 40 years, the... read more

Elephant Trails

elephant in outside yard Elephant Trails is more than an exhibit; it is also an extensive conservation program built on decades of science. The Smithsonian’s National Zoo’s rich history of caring for and studying Asian... read more

Asian elephant News

Elephant in water
Mar. 14, 2017
With a FONZ Conservation Grant, Smithsonian's National Zoo and Conservation Biology Institute scientists are able to understand the family trees of elephants at zoos around the country, as well as...
Jan. 06, 2017
How big does a “weeble-wobble” have to be to withstand the strength of six female Asian elephants? Over the fall 2016 semester, students at MICA, the Maryland Institute College of Art, sought to...
Sep. 06, 2016
Ever since 41-year-old Asian elephant Shanthi was diagnosed with arthritis in her front wrists more than a decade ago, animal care staff at the Smithsonian’s National Zoo have been working to minim

Smithsonian Returns Birds to Wild

After a ten-year hiatus, the Smithsonian Conservation Biology Institute (SCBI) repatriated three female Guam rails to their native Guam. The birds, referred to as ko’ko’ locally, departed Virginia on Sunday, March 19 and arrived in Guam early March 21.