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Migratory Birds Tracking Map

The migratory birds tracking map shows where some birds have traveled while they were wearing a tracking device. All of the information shown on the map is real scientific data collected by scientists who are studying these species. Narrow your search by using the dropdown menus to select a bird species and identity. Looking for latitude and longitude? Click one of the data points on the map or head over to the Migratory Birds Tracking Table.

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A researcher holds a medium-sized bird with white and gray-brown feathers, called a black-bellied plover
Learn more about the black-bellied plover, a large shorebird with a short neck and a distinctive black belly and face.
Learn more about the black-crowned night heron, a medium-sized heron with a stocky build, black crown, gray body and bright, red eyes.
A brown pelican, with a gray-brown body, white neck and head, and long bill
Learn more about the brown pelican, a large, unique bird that lives on shorelines and small islands in colonies with thousands of individuals.
A small, blue and yellow bird, called a Kirtland's warbler, held in a researcher's hand
Learn more about the Kirtland's warbler, an endangered bird that nearly went extinct in the past.
A long-billed curlew flying over a body of water with green hills in the background
Learn more about the long-billed curlew, North America's largest shorebird.
A duck-like bird, called a Pacific loon, swimming through clear water. The bird has dark feathers with white stripes, red eyes, a light gray head and a pointed bill.
Learn more about the Pacific loon, thought to be the most abundant loon in North America.
A large hawk with broad wings and a short tail flies through a clear sky with its wings spread wide
Learn more about the Swainson's hawk, a raptor with a thin body and narrow wings that migrates impressive distances.
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Black-bellied plover:

Team: North Slope (2015): Autumn-Lynn Harrison, Smithsonian Migratory Bird Center; Lee Tibbitts and Dan Ruthrauff, USGS Alaska Science Center; Nome, Seward Peninsula (2016): Autumn-Lynn Harrison, Smithsonian Migratory Bird Center; Phil Bruner, Brigham Young University–Hawaii
Tags: 5g Solar-powered Argos Satellite Transmitters, Microwave Telemetry.
Funding: This work was made possible by ConocoPhillips Global Signature Programs.

Black-crowned night heron:

Team: Amy Scarpignato, Smithsonian Migratory Bird Center
Tags: 9.5g Solar-powered Argos Satellite Transmitters, Microwave Telemetry.  
Funding: This work was made possible by ConocoPhillips Global Signature Programs.

Brown pelican:

Team: Autumn-Lynn Harrison, Smithsonian Migratory Bird Center and David Brinker, Maryland Department of Natural Resources
Tags: 65g Solar-powered GPS-Argos Satellite Transmitters, GeoTrak.
Funding: This work was made possible by a Friends of the National Zoo Conservation Research Grant. For more information, see photos from the expedition.

Long-billed curlew (both of the below):

Team: Autumn-Lynn Harrison, Peter Marra, Amy Scarpignato, Smithsonian Migratory Bird Center; David Newstead, Coastal Bend Bays & Estuaries Program, Coastal Bird Program
Tags: 9.5g Solar-powered Satellite Transmitters, Microwave Telemetry.  
Funding: This work was made possible by ConocoPhillips Global Signature Programs.

Team: Tim Keyes and team, Smithsonian Migratory Bird Center; David Newstead, South Carolina Department of Natural Resources.
Tags: 9.5g Solar-powered Satellite Transmitters, Microwave Telemetry. .
Funding: This work was made possible by ConocoPhillips Global Signature Programs, Georgia Department of Natural Resources, U.S. Fish and Wildlife, Wolf Island National Wildlife Refuge, South Carolina Department of Natural Resources.

Pacific loon:

Team: Joel Schumtz, Brian Uher-Koch, Ray Buchheit, Andrew Myers, USGS Alaska Science Center; Scott Ford, Smithsonian Migratory Bird Center
Tags: 44g Argos Implantable Avian Transmitters Microwave Telemetry.  
Funding: This work was made possible by BRI.